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Up on the Treetop

Technology has reached my sleepy remote village in Zimbabwe. Barely. But it’s there. You won’t find it on the ground, though.  You have to climb up the tree and catch it.

That’s what I had to do to take a telephone interview on a recent visit to my home. It was a balancing act, holding myself steady against the branches, while I held on to the cell phone. Throughout the conversation, I managed to answer the interviewer’s questions. Between the static noises and what I could manage to say while perched unsteadily on a tree, I can only hope that nothing was “lost in translation.”

While I’m excited about the changes that are coming to my village, I love seeing the parts of it that have stayed the same. I love seeing the red soil that as a child, my naked feet had walked on; the fields that I used to take our cattle to graze on; and most of all the men, women and children whose nobility, in the face of challenges,  never fails to inspire me. 

In the future, perhaps the people in Matau won’t have to climb a tree to make and take a telephone call. Perhaps the internet can finally reach the village and show my community how the rest of the world lives. But for now, I love Matau for what it is, a quiet village known for its dreams.
Up on the Treetop

Technology has reached my sleepy remote village in Zimbabwe. Barely. But it’s there. You won’t find it on the ground, though. You have to climb up the tree and catch it.

That’s what I had to do to take a telephone interview on a recent visit to my home. It was a balancing act, holding myself steady against the branches, while I held on to the cell phone. Throughout the conversation, I managed to answer the interviewer’s questions. Between the static noises and what I could manage to say while perched unsteadily on a tree, I can only hope that nothing was “lost in translation.”

While I’m excited about the changes that are coming to my village, I love seeing the parts of it that have stayed the same. I love seeing the red soil that as a child, my naked feet had walked on; the fields that I used to take our cattle to graze on; and most of all the men, women and children whose nobility, in the face of challenges, never fails to inspire me.

In the future, perhaps the people in Matau won’t have to climb a tree to make and take a telephone call. Perhaps the internet can finally reach the village and show my community how the rest of the world lives. But for now, I love Matau for what it is, a quiet village known for its dreams.
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See the video update of the progress at the Matau Primary School.