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Who can forget the BLIZZARD of 93 - it's been 20 years! I spent a week up in Polk Co, NC covering the rescue missions by the national guard. What do YOU remember?

Wikipedia remembers this "Storm of the Century" like this:  "The weight of record snows collapsed many factory roofs in the South, and snowdrifts on the windward sides of buildings caused a few decks with substandard anchors to fall from homes. Though the storm was forecast to strike the snow-prone Appalachian Mountains, hundreds of people were nonetheless rescued from the Appalachians, many caught completely off guard on the Appalachian Trail, or visiting cabins and lodges in remote locales. Drifts up to 14 feet (4.3 m) were observed at Mount Mitchell. Snowfall totals of between 2 and 3 feet (0.61 and 0.91 m) were widespread across northwestern North Carolina. Boone, North Carolina—in a high-elevation area accustomed to heavy snowfalls—was nonetheless caught off guard by 36"+ of snow and 24 hours of temperatures below 0 °F (−18 °C) along with storm winds which (according to NCDC storm summaries) gusted as high as 110 miles per hour (180 km/h). Electricity was not restored to many isolated rural areas for a week or more, with power cuts occurring all over the east. Nearly 60,000 lightning strikes were recorded as the storm swept over the country for a total of seventy-two hours, and many may remember their local news organizations touting the term "thundersnow." As one of the most powerful storms in recent history, the storm has been described as the "Storm of the Century" by many of the areas affected."
Who can forget the BLIZZARD of 93 - it's been 20 years! I spent a week up in Polk Co, NC covering the rescue missions by the national guard. What do YOU remember?

Wikipedia remembers this "Storm of the Century" like this: "The weight of record snows collapsed many factory roofs in the South, and snowdrifts on the windward sides of buildings caused a few decks with substandard anchors to fall from homes. Though the storm was forecast to strike the snow-prone Appalachian Mountains, hundreds of people were nonetheless rescued from the Appalachians, many caught completely off guard on the Appalachian Trail, or visiting cabins and lodges in remote locales. Drifts up to 14 feet (4.3 m) were observed at Mount Mitchell. Snowfall totals of between 2 and 3 feet (0.61 and 0.91 m) were widespread across northwestern North Carolina. Boone, North Carolina—in a high-elevation area accustomed to heavy snowfalls—was nonetheless caught off guard by 36"+ of snow and 24 hours of temperatures below 0 °F (−18 °C) along with storm winds which (according to NCDC storm summaries) gusted as high as 110 miles per hour (180 km/h). Electricity was not restored to many isolated rural areas for a week or more, with power cuts occurring all over the east. Nearly 60,000 lightning strikes were recorded as the storm swept over the country for a total of seventy-two hours, and many may remember their local news organizations touting the term "thundersnow." As one of the most powerful storms in recent history, the storm has been described as the "Storm of the Century" by many of the areas affected."
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Enough already!!