Jimmy Rollins Back to Main
BORN: November 27, 1978
BIRTHPLACE: Oakland, California
HEIGHT: 5'8"
Significant Other: Johari Smith
ON WHOSAY SINCE: Oct 26, 2011
HOMETOWN: Oakland, California
CURRENT LOCATION: Woolwich Township, New Jersey
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BIOGRAPHY

Jimmy Rollins was born November 27, 1978 in Oakland, California. As soon as he set foot on the baseball diamond, Jimmy was a star. He graduated from Encinal High School in 1996 where he was selected to the All-USA High School Baseball team by USA Today. In his high school career, Jimmy set 10 school career records and was selected to Baseball America’s Second Team All-American. Jimmy was drafted in the 2nd round of the 1996 draft to the Philadelphia Phillies, where he would play his whole major league career.

While spending the first four years of his career as a top prospect in the Phillies farm system, Jimmy made his Major League debut on September 17th, 2000 and never looked back.

In 2001, Jimmy began his first full season with the Philadelphia Phillies and wasted no time getting acclimated. Phillies fans had heard about Jimmy’s speed as he progressed through the farm system, and he certainly lived up to the hype. But that wasn’t all Jimmy would do in his impressive rookie season. Aside from setting the Phillies franchise record with 35 consecutive stolen bases without being caught, Jimmy became the first player since Lou Brock in 1968 to lead the National League in triples and stolen bases. He was the only player in the National League to accomplish a quadruple-double, hitting 29 doubles, 12 triples, 14 home runs and 46 stolen bases. He was selected to his first All Star team and finished third in the NL Rookie of the Year voting. Along with Jimmy’s success, he accrued awards such as Co-Winner of the NL Cool Papa Bell Award, presented by the Negro League Hall of Fame. He was also named to Topps Major League Rookie All-Star team.

In 2002, Jimmy had a stellar sophomore season and once again was the only player in the National League to post a quadruple-double, hitting 33 doubles, 10 triples, 11 home runs and 31 stolen bases. He also led the National League triples and at bats for the second straight season and finished second among NL shortstops with a .980 fielding percentage. He was rewarded with an All Star selection, only this time as the starting shortstop and became the first shortstop in MLB history to make the All-Star team in his first two Major League seasons. He was named Best Defensive Shortstop in the NL by Baseball America.

In 2003, Jimmy would continue to break milestones, becoming the 2nd shortstop in Phillies history to have 40+ doubles in a season…a mark that stood for nearly 70 years. Jimmy also stole his 100th career stolen base on September 27th vs. Atlanta.

In 2004, Jimmy recorded his third “quadruple-double” in four seasons, hitting 14 home runs, 43 doubles, 12 triples and stealing 30 bases…once again, the only National League player to accomplish that feat. At the conclusion of the season, Jimmy set career highs in several offensive categories, including the franchise record for most runs scored by a shortstop with 119. Jimmy’s season total of 30 stolen bases would be the first of six-straight 30+ seasons.

In 2005, Jimmy had a season that would be one for the record books. Throughout August and September, Jimmy strung together a 36-game hitting streak that broke the Phillies franchise record set in 1899 by Ed Delahanty. Jimmy would keep that streak going into the following season and set the record at 38…the 4th longest in National League history. Along with a record-breaking season, he was selected as the starting shortstop for the National League All Star team and posted his fourth quadruple double in five seasons, hitting 38 doubles, 11 triples, 12 home runs and 41 stolen bases. Jimmy finished in the top 10 in National League MVP voting for the first time in his career.

In 2006, Jimmy’s success began to reach new heights. He set the franchise record for home runs and runs in a season by a shortstop with 25 and 127, respectively. Those records would not hold up for long, as Jimmy would later break them the next season. Jimmy’s season totals of 45 doubles, 25 home runs, 127 runs, and 36 stolen bases, made him the second player in MLB history to post at least 40 doubles, 25 home runs, 120 runs and 35 stolen bases in a single season. He also blasted his 62nd career homerun to give the all-time Phillies record for homeruns by a shortstop. Against San Francisco, Jimmy would reach another milestone when he collected his 1,000th career hit at 27 years and 230 days old, becoming the second youngest player in franchise history to reach that mark. Jimmy fell one triple shy of completing his fourth straight quadruple-double.

2007, was a year Jimmy would certainly never forget. His season totals were simply amazing: .296 batting average, 212 hits, 139 runs, 38 doubles, 20 triples, 30 home runs, 41 stolen bases, .875 OPS. His totals for home runs and runs scored were franchise records for a shortstop. He became the first player in Major League history to have 200 hits, 15 triples, 25 home runs and 25 stolen bases in a single season. Jimmy also set National League records by a shortstop with 139 runs and 88 extra-base-hits. Another milestone in his career would be recorded on September 25 when Jimmy hit a home run against the Atlanta Braves that completed his 30 home run-30 stolen base season…just the third shortstop in Major League history to accomplish that feat. Jimmy also became only the fourth player in history to record a 20 double-20 triple-20 home run-20 stolen base season. After such a record-breaking season, Jimmy was awarded 2007 National League MVP as he led the Phillies to their first postseason appearance in 14 seasons. He also won the first of three straight Rawlings Gold Glove Awards as well as his first ever Silver Slugger Award.

In 2008, Jimmy received something more prestigious than the MVP Award he received the previous year…a World Championship. He established career highs in stolen bases (47) and on-base percentage (.349). He also broke his own franchise record for consecutive stolen base attempts without getting caught, at 39. Jimmy received his second-straight Gold Glove Award as he posted a career best .988 fielding percentage.

In 2009, Jimmy started the year off playing for the U.S. in the World Baseball Classic where he was named to the All-Tournament Team. During the season, he led the National League in plate appearances, recorded his eighth straight season of 30 or more doubles with 43 and ninth consecutive season of season of 20 or more stolen bases with 31. He would also set a personal best .990 fielding percentage, tops in the Major Leagues, which led to his third Gold Glove Award in as many years. The Phillies would go on to win their second straight National League title but fell short of a World Series repeat, falling to the New York Yankees.

2010 was an up and down year for Jimmy. Due to a string of injuries, he played in a career low 87 games but returned in time to make the Phillies postseason run. The club reached the NLCS for the third straight season but fell to the eventual World Series Champion, San Francisco Giants.

Jimmy’s off the field performance is just as important to him as his on field performance. Jimmy established the Rollins Family Foundation to help children and young adults living with arthritis by providing funds and awareness about the condition. He also supports families who are struggling financially with extracurricular activities for their children. In June of 2011, Jimmy will host the 6th Annual Celebrity BaseBOWL Tournament to raise money for his foundation as well as the Arthritis Foundation.